Skip to main content

My Oracle Open World Sessions

I will be presenting three times at Oracle Open World:

Session ID: CON7828
Session Title: The Whys and Wherefores of New Oracle Database 12c PL/SQL Features

Session ID: CON8265
Session Title: PL/SQL: The Scripting Language Liberator

Session ID: CON8450
Session Title: SQL (and PL/SQL) Tuning Experts Panel

Now, sure, that's plenty exciting.

But I have even more exciting news: we will be holding the first ever YesSQL! Celebration of SQL and PL/SQL event at OOW14 on Monday, September 29th, at 6:30 PM. Here's a description:

Co-hosted by Tom Kyte and Steven Feuerstein, YesSQL! is an Oracle Open World event celebrating SQL, PL/SQL, and the people who both make the technology and use it.

At YesSQL!, special guests Andy Mendelsohn, Maria Colgan, Andrew Holdsworth, Graham Wood and others share our stories with you, and invite you to share yours with us, because....

SQL Celebration is an open mic night. Tell us how SQL and PL/SQL - and the Oracle experts who circle the globe sharing their expertise - have affected your life!

And right after YesSQL! everyone is invited to join the big Tech Fest on Howard Street, where we can continue our conversations, and mingle with Java, MySQL and other developers in the vast Oracle ecosystem.

Bottom line: If developing applications against Oracle Database is a big a part of your life, join us for a fun and uplifting evening.

You'll be hearing more about YesSQL! in the coming months, but I thought I'd give you early notice so you can put it on your schedule.

Space is limited at YesSQL!, so be sure to sign up. The session ID is CON9027.

Comments

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Get rid of mutating table trigger errors with the compound trigger

When something mutates, it is changing. Something that is changing is hard to analyze and to quantify. A mutating table error (ORA-04091) occurs when a row-level trigger tries to examine or change a table that is already undergoing change (via an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement). In particular, this error occurs when a row-level trigger attempts to read or write the table from which the trigger was fired. Fortunately, the same restriction does not apply in statement-level triggers.

In this post, I demonstrate the kind of scenario that will result in an ORA-04091 errors. I then show the "traditional" solution, using a collection defined in a package. Then I demonstrate how to use the compound trigger, added in Oracle Database 11g Release1,  to solve the problem much more simply.

All the code shown in this example may be found in this LiveSQL script.

How to Get a Mutating Table Error

I need to implement this rule on my employees table:
Your new salary cannot be more than 25x th…

Table Functions, Part 1: Introduction and Exploration

August 2018 update: please do feel encourage to read this and my other posts on table functions, but you will learn much more about table functions by taking my Get Started with PL/SQL Table Functions class at the Oracle Dev Gym. Videos, tutorials and quizzes - then print a certificate when you are done!


Table functions - functions that can be called in the FROM clause of a query from inside the TABLE operator - are fascinating and incredibly helpful constructs.

So I've decided to write a series of blog posts on them: how to build them, how to use them, issues you might run into.

Of course, I am not the first to do so. I encourage to check out the documentation, as well as excellent posts from Adrian Billington (search for "table functions") and Tim Hall. Adrian and Tim mostly focus on pipelined table functions, a specialized variant of table functions designed to improve performance and reduce PGA consumption. I will take a look at pipelined table functions in the latte…

Quick Guide to User-Defined Types in Oracle PL/SQL

A Twitter follower recently asked for more information on user-defined types in the PL/SQL language, and I figured the best way to answer is to offer up this blog post.

PL/SQL is a strongly-typed language. Before you can work with a variable or constant, it must be declared with a type (yes, PL/SQL also supports lots of implicit conversions from one type to another, but still, everything must be declared with a type).

PL/SQL offers a wide array of pre-defined data types, both in the language natively (such as VARCHAR2, PLS_INTEGER, BOOLEAN, etc.) and in a variety of supplied packages (e.g., the NUMBER_TABLE collection type in the DBMS_SQL package).

Data types in PL/SQL can be scalars, such as strings and numbers, or composite (consisting of one or more scalars), such as record types, collection types and object types.

You can't really declare your own "user-defined" scalars, though you can define subtypes from those scalars, which can be very helpful from the perspective…