Care to join "Team Feuerstein"?

So on March 17, 2014 I joined Oracle Corporation as an Architect.

Wow, do they have lots of things for me to do!

And I want to do my very best with all of it:
  • Publish articles, presentations, white papers that are accurate, are readable, and have no mistakes.
  • Share my PL/SQL utility and sample code (and make sure they are readable and have no mistakes).
  • Find - and notify developers - about useful blogs, code and anything else relating to PL/SQL.
It is quickly becoming clear to me that I can't do it all, all by myself. And everyone else at Oracle is just as busy as me.

So I have decided to create "Team Feuerstein" - a group of Oracle technologists who share, with me, a delight for PL/SQL and SQL, and a desire to help build our community.

While you will not be paid in hard currency for your efforts, I will be very grateful and you will get public credit for your contribution.

I plan in the future to provide a webpage where you can submit an application to join the team and list your specialties. But I've decided that there is no reason to wait until that is ready.

I can get started right away soliciting your help!

So if you are interested you can do one of two things:

(a) Send an email to steven.feuerstein@oracle.com asking for more information.

(b) Send an email to steven.feuerstein@oracle.com to volunteer as a team member and provide the following information:

  • Background on your Oracle experience: free form text, LinkedIn profile, etc.
  • Your technical strengths: for example, I can definitely use help with non-trivial SQL, regular expressions, XML, etc. Core PL/SQL knowledge is, of course, great, too!
  • Other skills of interest: I plan to record lots of videos and podcasts, so if you have experience with this (esp on a Macbook), I'd love to hear about it. Excellent English writing skills? That would be very useful.
  • How you would like to be identified publicly.
Many thanks in advance for considering this!
Steven Feuerstein



Comments

  1. Well, the bit about non-trivial SQL sounds much more interesting than trivial SQL ;-)
    Can you use a dane with no Macbook experience whatsoever?

    ReplyDelete

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