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New Ranking Tags Feature of Oracle Dev Gym

                                

You can take quizzes, workouts and classes at the Oracle Dev Gym solely with the objective of learning and improving your expertise in Oracle technologies.

You can also play competitively, which means that you will be ranked when you take a tournament quiz. You can see all the rankings for tournaments by clicking on the Leaderboard tab.

But what if you'd like to see how you ranked compared to your co-workers or friends?

What if your entire dev team wants to take a workout together and then compare how you all did?

I have one answer to those questions: ranking tags!

Click on your name in upper right, select Profile Settings.

Click on the Ranking Tags tab.

It's empty! OK, now it's time to talk to your friends or co-workers. Decide on a tag that you can use to identify your little circle. Aim for something obviously unique. These are "just" tags, so if you use something like "ORADEV" and so does someone else, you will be in the same ranking filter list.

So decide on a tag, invite your friends to do the same thing. You can see everyone with the same tag in the profile settings page.

Once you've done that, you can choose the tag both on Leaderboard ranking reports and on a new Workout Rankings modal. You will see a button to open this modal when (a) you've completed the workout and (b) you've added at least one ranking tag to your profile.

The two minute video above shows you all of this. Enjoy!

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